538: Playing Roles

KMO welcomes author and game designer, Michael O. Varhola, to the C-Realm to discuss the story-telling alchemy that comes from getting a group of people together around a table with dice, character sheets and possibly some miniatures to engage in collaborative adventure-spinning. Michael is the founder of a gaming company called Skirmisher, and you can find all of their offerings on DriveThruRPG.com.

537: H1B Mission Creep

The H1B Visa program was originally intended to make sure that American tech companies had access to enough computer programmers to fix the Y2K bug before the stroke of midnight. Mission accomplished. But then the H1B program found a new mission. Kevin Lynn of U.S. Tech Workers explains how the program expanded and the effect that it continues to have on the culture of Silicone Valley and on the fate of Americans who have the aptitude and the skills to do the work that US firms would rather give to foreign workers.

Check out the GEBB webcomic and KMO's YouTube channel.

536: Recontextualizing Identity

KMO speaks with Mark Gober, author of An End to Upside Down Thinking: Dispelling the Myth That the Brain Produces Consciousness, and the Implications for Everyday Life. The idea that consciousness arises from sufficiently complex arrangements of matter isn't so much  a finding arrived at by scientific investigation as it is an axiom of the materialist worldview. Modern science doesn't lead to the conclusion brains produce consciousness so much as the scientific community demands that you accede to this starting assumption or keep quiet about your reservations if you want to be taken seriously. Mark Gober argues that experimental findings demonstrate that ideas concerning telepathy, precognition, remote viewing and life after death need to be given more thorough-going consideration than they currently receive in the scientific community.

535: The REAL Star Trek

Season 2 of both Star Trek: Discovery and The Orville are just weeks away. KMO talks to JP of Egotastic Funtime about both shows and why it is that The  Orville feels so much more like Star Trek than the official offering from CBS, the legal owners of the Star Trek IP. They also discuss YouTube as a means for independent content creators to distribute their content and as a way for corporations to create a simulacrum of grassroots supports for their products.