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CRV138

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Vault_Cover138Everything was hunky dory in the Roman empire until one day the barbarians showed up at the gates with legalized recreational marijuana. The Romans mounted a heroic defense. The officers barked at the soldiers under their commands, “Fight like demons, men! They’re here to turn our wives and daughters into POT WHORES!” But it was too late. One whiff of the devil’s weed and all the good Roman girls started hanging out with jazz musicians and drinking from lead cups. Thus did the empire fail. Eric Garland warns against relaxing our Drug War vigilance, lest we share Rome’s fate.

458: Wrangling Futures

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William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats

KMO welcomes futurist, Eric Garland, to the C-Realm to explain why it’s still important to look to the future. Eric is well aware of the bad rap that “futurism” has gotten in recent years, but he wears the futurist mantle with pride. Even flawed thinking about the future is better, in his opinion, than just assuming that the present moment will continue indefinitely forward. Toward the end of the program, Eric paints a picture of a future in which there is no single, systemic collapse but the present governing structures and institutions lose their perceived legitimacy and carry on in the buffoonish mode that is the bread and butter of satirical programs like The Daily Show. KMO closes with warnings from WB Yeats and Tyler Cowen about framing everything according to stories of good and evil.

CRV137

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Vault_Cover137KMO welcomes Larry Lowe back to the Vault to help bring together some of the recent C-Realm and CRV themes. In particular, Larry wanted to stress the magnitude of the change from Internet Protocol version 4 to IPV6. Larry also has some choice words for people who think that techno-philanthropy will reverse the disintegration of the middle class or halt the destruction of the biosphere.

457: Techno Extortion

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C-Realm_457_coverKMO talks with Marshall Brain, founder of HowStuffWorks, about the path that the United States is on with regard to jobs, automation, profitability and social cohesion. Marshall is the author of a novel called Manna that describes the dark road we’re on and one possible alternative. Is automation finally bringing the so-called “contradictions of capitalism” to a head? Perhaps we’re just going through a rough patch. Maybe the technological trends that are destroying middle class livelihoods and replacing them with McJobs will deliver us to the capitalist nirvana that the lords of Silicone Valley promise is just over the horizon. Maybe we need to revist some of the assumptions enshrined in the current economic orthodoxy.

CRV 136

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Krishnamacharya

Krishnamacharya

This episode consists of a long segment of after dinner conversation between Olga, KMO and their dinner guest, David Muehsam. The conversation begins with some fairly dense discussion on various methods and lineages of yoga but opens up into a discussion that cover climate change, over-population and the health effects from electromagnetism. David describes some cases in which EM fields have demonstrated therapeutic effects, even when the researcher was expecting to document adverse health effects. “There are more subtleties here than meets the eye,” says David.

456: Ready for Anything

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C-Realm_456_coverKMO welcomes Hal Brill to the C-Realm to talk about the book The Resilient Investor: A Plan for Your Life, Not Just Your Money. In a future marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity, investors need to overhaul their risk management toolkit. If the sorts of civilization-scale disruptions that are a regular theme on the C-Realm Podcast come to pass, being ready for anything means a lot more than just having your money in the right investments. Later in the podcast, KMO talks with Charles Eisenstein about living in the space between stories.

CRV135

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Vault_Cover135The discussion with Doug Lain about Leonard Nimoy’s legacy from C-Realm Podcast 455 morphs into a general discussions of Vulcans throughout the myriad Star Trek story vehicles with particular emphasis on the prequel series, Enterprise. Before that, KMO draws together threads from the writings of Esther Kaplan, Jaron Lanier and Marshall Brain to muse about the fact that as computing and remote sensors grow cheaper and more ubiquitous, life for working people becomes more harried and precarious while worker productivity and corporate profits soar.

455: JUST a Theory?

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KMO welcomes Professor James Krupa to the C-Realm to discuss his experience teaching evolution to college students in Kentucky. He is the author of an article in the new issue of Orion called “C-Realm_455_coverDefending Darwin” Does accepting the theory of evolution by natural selection automatically make a person an atheist? Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, as well as the Pope agree that a scientific worldview is compatible with religious faith. Strident atheists, like Richard Dawkins, as well as some religious fundamentalist demagogues, insist that we all have to choose sides. Later, KMO and Doug Lain pay tribute to the late Leonard Nimoy.

CRV134

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Peter Moskos

Peter Moskos

After the panel discussion about policing featured on C-Realm 454: Broken Windows, Professor Peter Moskos sat down with Professor Alex S. Vitale and several grad students to take the conversation to a deeper level. The conversation starts out as a continuation of Peter’s attempt to differentiate between Broken Windows and Zero Tolerance policing. Other topics include how well-intentioned liberal attempts to reign in police misbehavior have often made things worse, the relationship between the Drug War and police corruption, and what the proper role of police should be.

454: Broken Windows

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C-Realm_454_coverNew York mayor, Bill DeBlasio, and his police commissioner, Bill Bratton, both hold fast in their support for a community policing strategy called “Broken Windows.” Critics charge that the policy amounts to targeting black neighborhoods for absurdly stringent enforcement which sends people of color to jail for the most trivial of infractions; things for almost nobody living in more privileged neighborhoods would ever imagine they could be arrested. Is this an obviously failed policy, or has “Broken Windows” come to serve as a catch-all term for a wide variety of bad policing practices. Can relations between the black community and the police be repaired? Is it even coherent to talk of “repairing” something that has never been right? This episode of the C-Realm Podcast features excerpts from a panel discussion that takes on these questions.