417: Timelines for Collapse

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Jay Smith and Mark Robinowitz

Jay Smith and Mark Robinowitz

KMO attended the 2014 Age of Limits conference, and he invited C-Realm listeners who were in attendance to join him in a recorded conversation that took place at the same time as the main conversation in the round described on the schedule. The setting was a campground in the woods in rural Pennsylvania at nightfall. The conversation began at dusk and ended by lantern light. There is a bit of electromagnetic interference toward the end of the recording, but the content was too good to sacrifice, so please bear with us. At the end of the program, KMO talks with Justin Ritchie of the Extraenvironmentalist podcast about the upcoming Common Bound gathering in Boston, organized by the New Economy Coalition.

 

You can sign up for the pay-as-you-can conference livestream here: http://commonbound.org/blog/livestream-tickets-now-available-its-pay-what-you-can

  • Erik Knutzen

    Thanks for another great podcast KMO! I enjoyed this discussion–it was the type of productive dialog I felt was missing from the 2013 Age of Limits. Clearly the egregore was different this year. One highlight in 2013 was meeting Jay, if just briefly. Glad he got to share some of what he’s been up to.

  • James

    It seems a majority of the crowd are middle aged rural people who own homes, have good jobs, and have the ability to grow food on land. Most people are not so lucky. It seems these people in the circle lean towards the individualism of hoarding food and teaching themselves how to grow food.

    What about people in cities who live in apartment building & live paycheck to paycheck? This is a majority of the population. Also, I think the social decline is a much bigger issue than the environmental issue. If things get bad, people are more likely to kill each other than help poor people out. We don’t have institutions that promote solidarity in cities.

  • M

    James, I was there and in this discussion, and you’re correct. Large cities were frowned upon by quite a few people there. As far as individualism, that may have been your take-away, but many there were more small community focused than anything.